Kindling

Artwork & Poetry

$19.95

247 in stock

Imprint: Lantern Publishing & Media
Availability: In stock
“It is difficult to find the balance between art and activism. Linnea Ryshke’s, Kindling, weaves poetry, photography, and painting into a heartbreakingly beautiful book about finding and holding space for the more-than-human. She creates a lasting dialogue between embodiment and materiality, the didactic and the ambiguous, and art and activism that avoids the trap of overt sentimentality. Kindling provides us that elusive and magical space in between, where empathy and change can flourish and grow.”
—Kathryn Eddy, artist activist and co-editor of The Art of the Animal: Fourteen Women Artists Explore the Sexual Politics of Meat
 
“So many poets use non-human animals as metaphors, motivators, comforts. Linnea Ryshke takes a refreshingly different tack in her work: She sees other animals. And she doesn’t just see, she witnesses. She shares with us using language that is apt, deft, unflinching, breathtaking. But Ryshke’s empathy and craft aren’t ends in themselves; they lead us where we desperately need to go: a kinder world. Yes, art can do that. Yes, this art does that.”
—Gretchen Primack, poet and author of Kind
 
Kindling is a book that echoes in the reader long after closing the book. The images and poetry of Linnea Ryshke lead us to not only reckon with the violence perpetuated against animals, but to witness their resistance and agency. Gentle yet piercing, Kindling achieves what so much of our culture fails in: seeing animal others without possessing them. What emerges from that view is a silent yet powerful demand to, in Ryshke’s words, ‘know them as kin, not kindling.’”
—Terike Haapoja, artist
 
Kindling is unlike any work I have read. It is a book for the senses—visceral—and meant to be breathed in, if you are brave. It reveals Linnea Ryshke as scholar-empath-artist-poet. She weaves together drawings, photographs and words, asking us to see, hear and understand oneness with all living beings. It is wild—delving into experiment and offering the reader an experience. To read Kindling is to take passage through gore and truth. We are asked to muster the courage to look, to digest the words, to see anew.”
—Colleen Plumb, photographer with her most recent book, Thirty Times a Minute

“In her unique volume Kindling, artist, animal activist, and ethnographer Linnea Ryshke uses observational research to skillfully construct an empathetic space within which readers encounter animals who are essentially invisible in our culture: those raised for food. Ryshke’s fearless willingness to turn toward death rather than away from it, her inclination to employ curiosity when confronted by ideologies so different from her own, and her attempts to establish a bridge of compassion with beings whose life experience she was powerless to change, all make this beautiful book a valuable companion for facing the challenges of our own provocative and demanding times. Blending art and ethnographic research, Kindling is an ideal addition to the animal studies, critical animal studies, art, literature, or ethics classroom.”
—Julia Schlosser, lecturer in the Art department at California State University, Northridge and the curator, RememberingAnimals.art
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Book Details

Pages

114 Pages

Size

6 x 9

Format

Hardcover

Pub. Date

09/07/2021

ISBN

978-1-59056-643-5

Publisher

Lantern Publishing & Media

Authors

Linnea Ryshke received an MFA from Washington University in St. Louis and a BFA in painting from Pratt Institute, minoring in environmental studies. She creates paintings, artist books, installations, and poetry that respond to the “othering” of nonhuman animals. Along with her studio practice, she has served as the administrative director for Culture Push, Inc., a nonprofit arts organization in New York City that focuses on supporting socially engaged art projects. While at Culture Push, Ryshke was involved with PUSH/PULL, the annual online journal publication, curating an issue titled “Entering the Space of the Absent Referent.” She was also a research intern at the Animal Museum in Los Angeles in 2016. Her work has been featured at Des Lee Gallery in St. Louis, the Jewish Art Salon, and Eastern Kentucky University.

A collection of beautifully poignant and moving poems and artwork from a talented artist who spent a summer interacting with the animals on an organic meat farm.
In the summer of 2019, artist and poet Linnea Ryshke worked as a laborer at an organic meat farm. She transformed what she saw, as well as the specific and acute interactions she had with the animals, into a series of poems, photographs, and artwork. Linnea’s intimate, honest, and poignant experience reflects what it means to confront the lives and deaths of individual creatures under your care. As she writes: “Connection, the kind that nourishes the marrow, does not know the bounds of species. I do not risk hyperbole to say that all humans know this truth. My dog led me to the field of simple joys, and when she died, I was not prepared for the torrent of grief. The hen who harbored distrust of humans slowly warmed to me through my daily ritual of sitting with her in the barn. The turkey who, in the instant I entered her pen, ran up and inspected me. I relish the moments, from the prolonged to the acute, when I come body to body, being to being, with an animal Other.” Kindling’s artwork, poetry, and profound evocations of experiences with animals will leave a lasting impression on the reader.
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“It is difficult to find the balance between art and activism. Linnea Ryshke’s, Kindling, weaves poetry, photography, and painting into a heartbreakingly beautiful book about finding and holding space for the more-than-human. She creates a lasting dialogue between embodiment and materiality, the didactic and the ambiguous, and art and activism that avoids the trap of overt sentimentality. Kindling provides us that elusive and magical space in between, where empathy and change can flourish and grow.”
—Kathryn Eddy, artist activist and co-editor of The Art of the Animal: Fourteen Women Artists Explore the Sexual Politics of Meat
 
“So many poets use non-human animals as metaphors, motivators, comforts. Linnea Ryshke takes a refreshingly different tack in her work: She sees other animals. And she doesn’t just see, she witnesses. She shares with us using language that is apt, deft, unflinching, breathtaking. But Ryshke’s empathy and craft aren’t ends in themselves; they lead us where we desperately need to go: a kinder world. Yes, art can do that. Yes, this art does that.”
—Gretchen Primack, poet and author of Kind
 
Kindling is a book that echoes in the reader long after closing the book. The images and poetry of Linnea Ryshke lead us to not only reckon with the violence perpetuated against animals, but to witness their resistance and agency. Gentle yet piercing, Kindling achieves what so much of our culture fails in: seeing animal others without possessing them. What emerges from that view is a silent yet powerful demand to, in Ryshke’s words, ‘know them as kin, not kindling.’”
—Terike Haapoja, artist
 
Kindling is unlike any work I have read. It is a book for the senses—visceral—and meant to be breathed in, if you are brave. It reveals Linnea Ryshke as scholar-empath-artist-poet. She weaves together drawings, photographs and words, asking us to see, hear and understand oneness with all living beings. It is wild—delving into experiment and offering the reader an experience. To read Kindling is to take passage through gore and truth. We are asked to muster the courage to look, to digest the words, to see anew.”
—Colleen Plumb, photographer with her most recent book, Thirty Times a Minute

“In her unique volume Kindling, artist, animal activist, and ethnographer Linnea Ryshke uses observational research to skillfully construct an empathetic space within which readers encounter animals who are essentially invisible in our culture: those raised for food. Ryshke’s fearless willingness to turn toward death rather than away from it, her inclination to employ curiosity when confronted by ideologies so different from her own, and her attempts to establish a bridge of compassion with beings whose life experience she was powerless to change, all make this beautiful book a valuable companion for facing the challenges of our own provocative and demanding times. Blending art and ethnographic research, Kindling is an ideal addition to the animal studies, critical animal studies, art, literature, or ethics classroom.”
—Julia Schlosser, lecturer in the Art department at California State University, Northridge and the curator, RememberingAnimals.art