Uncharted

A Rediscovered History of Voyages to the Americas Before Columbus

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Imprint: New Page Books
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“Get ready to chart a new course through human history! While many researchers promise to rewrite history, Uncharted delivers. Tim Wallace-Murphy’s meticulous scholarship and James Martin’s thought-provoking connections illuminate the rich and often controversial history of the Americas prior to Columbus. This book is a must-read for those daring enough to set sail on this unforgettable journey.​” —Heather Lynn, PhD, author, The Anunnaki Connection and Evil Archaeology

“In Uncharted, Timothy Wallace-Murphy does much more than make the case that such voyages occurred; he proves the point beyond any doubt—brilliantly. The conclusion, based on Wallace-Murphy’s research is undeniable: it’s both counterintuitive and counter-logical to believe ancient humans didn't navigate across the Earth’s vast oceans with the need to follow the climate and animal herds, both on land and sea, as long as humans have been mobile, which is a long, long time.” —Glenn Kreisberg, author of Spirits in Stone: The Secrets of Megalithic America
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Book Details

Pages

224 Pages

Size

6 x 9

Format

Trade Paperback

Pub. Date

04/03/2023

ISBN

978-1-63748-011-3

Publisher

Red Wheel Weiser

Authors

Tim Wallace-Murphy (1930–2019) studied medicine at University College, Dublin, and then qualified as a psychologist; he later became an author, lecturer, and historian. He has written more than a dozen books, including The Mark of the Beast (with Trevor Ravenscroft), Rex Deus, and Rosslyn: Guardian of the Secrets of the Holy Grail. This last book provided invaluable source material to Dan Brown for his bestselling novel The Da Vinci Code.
 
James Martin is a British historian, economist, and lecturer. James has previously worked in finance and employment law, and is presently a lecturer in further and higher education. He has dedicated a large portion of his more recent life to research into the Knights Templar, the Roman Empire, and the Western traditions of spirituality.
 

An exploration of the history, mythology, and evidence of those who traveled to pre-Columbian America.
 
Native groups have lived in the Americas for more than 10,000 years, but the voyages of Columbus surely did not bring the first visitors. Uncharted covers a range of cultures who seemingly visited the Americas long before Columbus, including Egyptians, Greeks, Celts, Vikings, as well as various people from Asia; and one large Chinese group who likely settled in the Americas in 100 BC. Wallace-Murphy and Martin delve into a wealth of evidence and stories, from potential Roman and Phoenician shipwrecks off the coast of South America to Celtic and Norse exploration of North America.
 
How did the Knights Templar influence the discovery of the New World? How did the Vikings navigate their way? What do the Sinclair family, the Rosslyn Chapel, and two Venetian brothers have to do with the discovery of a new continent? With source materials dating back through millennia, including very recent finds, this book will present a side of history still so readily dismissed by some.

Columbus should be remembered, but remembered for the conquering tyrant he was. These other groups did not come to conquer, but to trade, explore, and escape.

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“Get ready to chart a new course through human history! While many researchers promise to rewrite history, Uncharted delivers. Tim Wallace-Murphy’s meticulous scholarship and James Martin’s thought-provoking connections illuminate the rich and often controversial history of the Americas prior to Columbus. This book is a must-read for those daring enough to set sail on this unforgettable journey.​” —Heather Lynn, PhD, author, The Anunnaki Connection and Evil Archaeology

“In Uncharted, Timothy Wallace-Murphy does much more than make the case that such voyages occurred; he proves the point beyond any doubt—brilliantly. The conclusion, based on Wallace-Murphy’s research is undeniable: it’s both counterintuitive and counter-logical to believe ancient humans didn't navigate across the Earth’s vast oceans with the need to follow the climate and animal herds, both on land and sea, as long as humans have been mobile, which is a long, long time.” —Glenn Kreisberg, author of Spirits in Stone: The Secrets of Megalithic America